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Archive for June, 2012

It is now over six months since I began this treatment regime, and I remain drug-free*.  At last I am able to report signs of improvement in both what I can do and how I am feeling.  Progress has been imperceptibly gradual but looking back to how I was last November and December it is tangible in the following ways:

For many months I could hardly brush my own hair. I just was not able at all to stand with my head over the basin while someone washed my hair.  Recently I have been able to wash my own hair, even the long protracted business after home-dying it.

My hands and arms were almost permanently hurting whereas in recent weeks they only twinge occasionally.  The awful feeling as if the cells were dying in my upper arms has also thankfully ceased.

Apart from one day last week I have had more energy to tackle jobs that I have long wanted to get back to.  I’m still hopelessly slow off the mark in a morning, getting up late and not doing much at all before midday but I have had days when I’ve been on my feet pottering about from midday to around six, with breaks of course, and I almost always lie down for a 15-20 minute rest some time in the afternoon.

And finally I plucked up courage to go back to the swimming pool.  It IS a very safe, small and fairly warm environment at our local gym, and the steam room is a huge help.  What has made this return possible is the fact that we finally realised that they have a disabled changing room.  I would struggle to get myself dressed safely in the normal changing room but now my husband can help me and there is more space, handrails and a proper seat etc.  We have been three times now and I hope to go at least once each week time permitting.  There are a few other elderly and disabled people who also use the changing room so it can be a bit tricky choosing the best time to go to avoid a queue!  Regular exercise in the pool should enable me to improve flexibility and build up more muscle strength.  Muscle loss was/is still a big concern, but more about that in another post.

So, to sum up ….  I think I may at last be beginning to reap the benfits of my chosen treatment plan, which continues to develop as I read and learn more about recent research and theories on different aspects of nutrition.

* I do still take medication for my ischaemic heart condition, a daily low dose beta blocker, apirin, and statin.

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gloop

Another feature of the treatment plan I have been following for the past six months requires the daily consumption of Blackstrap Molasses. 

Molasses is made from raw, unsulphured cane sugar.  It is a black, treacle-like substance, packed with nutrients, and may be taken at any time when most convenient.  A dose of one teaspoonful to be taken three times daily is recommended.  It can be taken neat, or spread on toast or on porridge, or diluted in water.  However it is taken, as a food packed with iron and minerals, molasses is a wonderful blood-cleanser for arthritics.  There is lots more information on the benefits in the book (Treating Arthritis The drug-free way).

I take my doses neat from the jar.  At first I found this almost impossible due to an inclination to retch!  But I persevered and now can eat the stuff direct from the teaspoon.  As well as being a bit of an acquired taste, it is also a physically tricky procedure, judging how much actually is a spoonful because it has a tendency to run off the spoon and is very sticky!  My main problem is remembering to take it at a convenient time.  This is partly because one has to follow up with a drink of warm water otherwise it can stain one’s teeth. Because I forget so often I tend to take a heaped spoonful at a time and often forget to take any for days at a time! 

Finding this product in the shops can be tricky.  I now buy mine mail order from Goodness Direct, an online company I am happy to recommend.

http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-local/frameset/detail/583892_Meridian_Fairtrade_Organic_Molasses_Price_Marked_Pack_350g.html

 

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